Posts Tagged ‘Blended Coffee’


Fair Trade USA, the leading third-party certifier of Fair Trade products in the United States, celebrates National Fair Trade Awareness Month with a multitude of news announcements from household brand names to coincide with the Natural Products Expo East in Boston.

Fair Trade has generated significant momentum during  in the United States. Ben & Jerry’s and Green & Black’s kicked-off the year by announcing they would convert 100 percent of their products to Fair Trade Certified? ingredients; Green Mountain Coffee converted two of its top iconic blends?Our Blend and Vermont Country Blend?to Fair Trade; certified coffee imports were up 25 percent and 47 percent of all imports were also organic; Fair Trade cooperative CECOVASA was awarded the People’s Choice Award at the Specialty Coffee Association of America’s Cupping Competition; and the Fair Trade Towns USA campaign increased the number of official Fair Trade Towns from 13 to 20, including Boston.
And now SPINS, the first company to offer Natural Products sales data to the industry, has issued a report that builds on that strong foundation. SPINS reports that sales of Fair Trade Certified? products at grocery stores grew by 30 percent this year, to $140 million, lead by growth in packaged coffee (44 percent), and ready-to-drink tea and coffees (51 percent).(1)  Other notable double-digit contributors include the refrigerated juices & functional beverages category that was introduced in 2009 (98 percent), carbonated beverages (38 percent), chocolate candy (29 percent), and shelf stable functional beverages (10 percent). Frozen desserts are up eight percent and teas are up four percent, with cocoa and hot chocolate as the only category to experience a decline, down eight percent.

This is yet more proof that even in tough economic times, consumers care. In 2009, the BBMG Conscious Consumer Report stated that three-fourths of consumers (77 percent) believe they can make a difference by buying products from socially and environmentally responsible companies, and two-thirds agreed that even in tough economic times it’s important to buy products with social and environmental benefits (4 point scale). And over half (51 percent) agreed that they are willing to pay more. (Source: Fair Trade USA)

We have a line of Fair Trade Certified Coffees – click here -

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For centuries, Yemeni coffee has set a global standard because of its distinct flavour and authentic taste.  However, economic and political obstacles have hurt the Yemeni coffee industry, which is now struggling to survive.
Yemen has been described as the country of coffee since time immemorial. Yemeni coffee has brought the country recognition throughout the years, but in recent years its dominance has waned.
The flavour of  Yemeni coffee is distinct and renowned around the world.
It is usually described as having a flavour reminiscent of wine due to the fact that many farmers store coffee beans in stone stores until they are ready to be sent to the market.
Yemeni coffee, called Mocha, is named after the port of al-Makha, from which coffee used to be exported in large quantities. The mocha name has been adopted by the coffee community and is now known throughout the world.
However, many farmers have stopped growing coffee beans. Young farmers in the remote mountains are finding that the coffee market has become less lucrative.
The yield of the coffee trade is no longer sufficient, and young farmers are facing difficulties meeting the requirements of cultivation due to government neglect in supporting coffee plantations. Additionally, Yemeni farmers face obstacles in marketing and exporting their products.
Coffee crops occupy a special place in Yemeni collective memory, and it is widely believed that this particular tree is the first national crop. This crop had a strong global presence from the early sixth century AD until the mid-nineteenth century.

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Knowledge is great, even if any given piece of information has no apparent use or benefit.  After all, what we know helps define who we are and how we think about the world.  Understanding ourselves tends to lead to richer, more meaningful interactions with the world and those in it.

When did coffee first arrived to Hawaii.

If you look into the history of coffees arrival to Hawaii, you’ll discover that most sources report that it was first brought by the Spaniard Don Francisco de Paula Marin, but that his plantings weren’t successful.

In the next sentence, you’ll probably read that it was successfully introduced in 1825 when it arrived from Brazil on the HMS Blonde- with no assistance from Marin.  One of two dates will be written for its initial introduction by Marin: January 21, 1813 or December 30, 1817.

Another book quotes the 1817 date.  After some research with the assistance of Skip Bittenbender (agriculture extension specialist and professor at the University of Hawai’i) and Gerald Kinro (environmental consultant and author of A Cup of Aloha: The Kona Coffee Epic),  reasearch indicates and are now inclined to think that neither of these dates are correct.  In fact, I now believe that coffee first arrived to Hawaii in 1825.

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NAIROBI – Kenya researchers at the county’s Coffee Research Foundation based at Ruiru have developed a new coffee variety that is expected to achieve a substantial yield given its resilience to disease and other aggressors.
“The variety is tall, high yielding, resistant to coffee berry disease and leaf rust,” the director of the research station, Dr Joseph Kimemia told Xinhua, China news agency, in a exclusive interview.

Gourmet coffee

Gourmet Coffee on The BBQ

Dr Kimemia explained the new high quality coffee – Batian – is quick to establish, producing results after 18-24 months upon being planted, in addition to being suitable to all Arabica coffee growing areas.
He stressed the variety – the outcome of painstaking effort by the researchers since the same station released the much acclaimed Ruiru 11 in 1985 – farmers will be in a position to harvest five tonnes of clean coffee per hectare.
A researcher in his own right, Dr Kimemia recalled farmers on average harvested an average of two tonnes of clean coffee per hectare at present.
“At times, small scale coffee farmers even harvest half a tonne, ” Dr Kimemia emphasized.
“It has come in handy and at the right time. The variety is also suitable for new growing areas of the North Rift and for the real coffee estates.”
Researchers estimate that farmers will be able to plant an estimated 1,000 coffee tree under an acre.
Only 540 trees are planted per acre where SL 28 and SL varieties are grown.
It is hoped that Batian will help bolster Kenyan coffee production and enable the country to reclaim its previous status in the global coffee market.
Expected to be released to coffee growers later this year, Dr Joseph Kimemia commented on the new variety’s potential to overtake Ruiru 11, at present the most widely-grown variety within Kenya.
Development of Ruiru 11 also took into consideration the importance of quality as a major marketing parameter. Since the quality of the traditional varieties was already popular among consumers of Kenyan coffee, Ruiru 11 was developed with quality attributes similar to the traditional varieties.
Currently below its predicted target, Dr Kimemia encouraged domestic farmers to boost their annual coffee production to 100, 000 metric tonnes in order to mirror the 2 percent to 4 percent increase in global coffee consumption and therefore demand.
International Coffee Organization (ICO) executive director, Nestor Osorio, has predicted that global coffee consumption — which he says has been relatively unscathed by the economic downturn — will reach 134 million bags in 2010.
Based on 60 kg of coffee per bag, this equates to over 8 billion kg of the commodity and represents a 1.5 percent increase on the previous year’s figure of 132 million bags, continuing the steady growth of the past five years.
The nation’s coffee industry research body is reported to have allocated finance to inject into the renovation of facilities and their production capacity in readiness for the release of the variety, widely expected to boost coffee production that has been on the decline.
In Kenya, the 2009 Economic Survey showed that the coffee sub- sector registered a 21.3 percent decline in production from 53,400 tonnes in 2006/07 to 42,000 tonnes in the 2007/08 crop. This was mainly due to the effects of adverse weather.
The volume of coffee produced in Kenya has been on a steady decline, from a high of 128,000 tonnes in 1987/88 to 42,000 tonnes in 2007/08.
According to agriculture permanent secretary Dr Romano Kiome, coffee production was hardest hit than tea as it is a crop more vulnerable to a persistent cold snap.
“It is probably even worse for coffee because what is affected for coffee is flowering, so it doesn’t flower when it is cold,” says Kiome.
“It may go from what we had predicted at 56,000 metric tonnes to less than 50,000 this year.”
Most Kenyan coffee is grown at high altitude and therefore classified as specialty.
Although a small producer, at an average 50,000 tonnes annually, Kenya is among other regional growers whose coffees are highly sought by roasters globally.

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Colombian exports in June climbed 11.7 percent in June to $3 billion from a year earlier, the government’s statistics institute, or Dane reported yesterday.
The June figures continue a pattern of increases in Colombia’s exports, boosted by sales of oil, coal, coffee and ferronickel. These products together climbed 30% in June and reached sales of $1.54 billion. Non-traditional exports, which include manufacturing and agricultural goods, declined 12% to $1.05 billion.
The export sector has enjoyed a strong recovery after suffering steep declines last year. In the first six months of 2010, exports are up 24.3% to $19.2 billion.
According to Jorge Lozano, head of Colombias National Association of Coffee Exporters, rainfall in Colombia may hamper a recovery in coffee production from last years 33-year low.

Gourmet coffee

Gourmet Coffee on The BBQ

Persistent wet weather may deprive plants of sunlight and stunt growth of coffee beans said Lozano.
Its going to affect the harvest if it keeps raining like this,? he said yesterday in a telephone interview from Bogota. The beans cant grow without sun.?
According to the nations state-run Institute of Hydrology, Meteorology and Environmental Studies, Colombia may have abundant rainfall as of September because of the return of the weather pattern known as La Nina.

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Yes we do do private label coffee. We are able with our state of the art equipment create your label and put it on our coffee.  We already do it for a number of people and companies.

One of my personally proudest example is Mr. Bun E Carlos the drummer for the rock band Cheap Trick.  I spent my high school years in Beloit WI not that far from the home of the then rising band Cheap Trick.  Made of of the great singer Robin Zander, future designer of the 12 string bass Tom Peterson, semi insane guitarist Rick Nielsen, and the remarkable drummer Bun E Carlos, they were on the rise to the top and I had seen them many times.  Sometimes sneaking into an adults only show with a fake ID.  Little did I know then that later in life I would become friends with the band.

Many years later, around 1990 I got to know a rock concert promoter.  One day I get a call from him saying you know I am doing a show tonite in Iowa, if you wanna come down you can see Cheap Trick.  Well it didn’t take me long before I was down there and rocking to a band I had not seen live in years.  After the show I got to meet the band and me and Bun E hit it off.  Our love of music, and fishing the mighty muskie grew into a still standing friendship.

Flash forward 8 years and I am hanging out with the band at First Ave in Minneapolis Minnesota.  As usual I brought several bags of coffee from my retail coffeeshop for the band as a thank you gift for the back stage passes and free tickets to the show.  Bun E and I are talking as I hand him a couple bags of coffee.  Robin happens to walk by and said something to the effect of “Excellent now we got some good coffee to drink, say how come your not selling a Bun E Carlos Blend?“.  What an idea, dahhhh… I look at Bun E he looks at me and I say you wanna have your own brand of Gourmet Coffee?  Sure he says and the rest is history.

Bun E Carlos Blend was born on that nite and to this day I do not think there is another Rock Star or band that has their own brand of Coffee.  The blend has gone through several revisions and refinements and is now in Version 2.0 to keep up with the TECH TALK..  LOL… It has also been shipped all over the world.  From Japan to Italy, Bulgaria, France, England, Spain, Canada, almost every state in the US.  We have shipped Bun E’s coffee all over the place.

So if you have ever thought of having your own Brand of Coffee we can certainly help you develop your own line of coffee.  Drop me an email or give me a call and we will talk about it.

Sparky

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